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View Full Version : What does Senpai Mean? And Aniki? And Nakama?


Soccer Ninja 21
04-08-2009, 08:26 AM
What does senpai mean? I have an idae but i'm not sure....

*ichigorukiafan*
04-08-2009, 08:33 AM
i think it means teacher.....maybe? lol.

Natsumii145
04-08-2009, 08:34 AM
I think Senpai is like an upperclassman, someone higher in rank than you.

SRhyse
04-08-2009, 08:44 AM
I think Senpai is like an upperclassman, someone higher in rank than you.
That is the sense of it.

More literally, it means "Proceeding Person." It's a social term in Japanese that refers to the status of someone that's more experienced in doing something you're either doing or would like to, used most often in anime when refering to upperclassmen in school, though it applies within any sort of social system you can advance in, the military or a corporation being another example.

I carries with it the idea that they're your 'mentor.'

Toma RNK
04-08-2009, 09:22 AM
Kohai is the opposite. If you are my "Senpai" I am your "Kouhai."

Though it usually has an age connotation, it actually has to do with experience in a given field. 9 times out of 10 this means the older person is the "Senpai."

narutorocks
04-08-2009, 10:32 AM
Kohai is the opposite. If you are my "Senpai" I am your "Kouhai."

Though it usually has an age connotation, it actually has to do with experience in a given field. 9 times out of 10 this means the older person is the "Senpai."
Cool.

Naruto-Uzumaki-25
04-08-2009, 02:27 PM
I think it means someone who is superior or has a higher rank or something like that. ;)

SRhyse
04-08-2009, 02:42 PM
I think it means someone who is superior or has a higher rank or something like that. ;)
That's a good way to sum it up too!

Tracer
04-08-2009, 02:46 PM
First after a Green NAME!!!!

Senpai means one who is wiser then myself a sign of respect like when working the person who was there before you is your senpai

SRhyse
04-08-2009, 02:47 PM
First after a Green NAME!!!!

Quit doing that ;)!

Toma RNK
04-08-2009, 02:54 PM
bloking tracer.... :p

Tracer
04-08-2009, 03:03 PM
First after a Green NAME!!!!

Quit doing that ;)!
bloking tracer.... :p

Hate me or love me either way you are still thinking about me! sides it feels great to be first at something!

Soccer Ninja 21
04-08-2009, 03:03 PM
Thanks guys that's pretty much what I thought it was but I didn't want to say there wrong meaning and embarss myself, thanks.

SRhyse
04-08-2009, 03:13 PM
As a side note, 'Aniki' is a term they use in the series in a very similar way.

The difference with Aniki, however, is that it's exclusively male, and much more colloquial. Kinda like a Senpai version of 'Bro.' 'Aneki' is the female version of 'Aniki.'

Toma RNK
04-08-2009, 03:15 PM
If you are giving japanese lessons perhaps you want to go into detail about the significance of "Nakama" as opposed to "Tomodachi" as it is also quite important.

Soccer Ninja 21
04-08-2009, 03:18 PM
If you are giving japanese lessons perhaps you want to go into detail about the significance of "Nakama" as opposed to "Tomodachi" as it is also quite important. ok you lost me on that one... :?

Toma RNK
04-08-2009, 03:19 PM
ok you lost me on that one... :?

Ill give SRhyse a shot, if he passes ill explain.

Tracer
04-08-2009, 03:20 PM
If you are giving japanese lessons perhaps you want to go into detail about the significance of "Nakama" as opposed to "Tomodachi" as it is also quite important.

wow humm yeah...

try proper use of Kun, Saima, Nei-chan

Soccer Ninja 21
04-08-2009, 03:20 PM
If you are giving japanese lessons perhaps you want to go into detail about the significance of "Nakama" as opposed to "Tomodachi" as it is also quite important.

wow humm yeah...

try proper use of Kun, Saima, Nei-chan ya I get those a lot better. :) kun, anyway

Toma RNK
04-08-2009, 03:23 PM
wow humm yeah...

try proper use of Kun, Saima, Nei-chan

ne-chan - sister or "sis" as it is informal.

Kun - informal suffix typically used on males, -chan typical for females.

Saima means nothing to me unless it is a typo for -sama

-sama is a very formal and respectful suffix, used to give someone great honor or if there is a large gap in social status. For example: Hokage-sama

SRhyse
04-08-2009, 03:24 PM
If you are giving japanese lessons perhaps you want to go into detail about the significance of "Nakama" as opposed to "Tomodachi" as it is also quite important.
Gladly ;).

'Tomodachi' means friend, pretty much as simply as that.

'Nakama,' on the other hand, technically means 'comrade,' but not in the negative ways it took on after the way it was used during the second war. 'Nakama' is kind of like a non-sexual form of partnership between people, a sort of 'friend marriage' that extends to the way people decide to live while vowing to get eachother's back. Nakama is the term the characters in Naruto, and in similar animes like One Piece, use to describe the bond they share.

In some ways, it gets regarded more highly than marriage itself, though mainly just in popular culture.

Toma RNK
04-08-2009, 03:26 PM
If you are giving japanese lessons perhaps you want to go into detail about the significance of "Nakama" as opposed to "Tomodachi" as it is also quite important.
Gladly ;).

'Tomodachi' means friend, pretty much as simply as that.

'Nakama,' on the other hand, technically means 'comrade,' but not in the negative ways it took on after the way it was used during the second war. 'Nakama' is kind of like a non-sexual form of partnership between people, a sort of 'friend marriage' that extends to the way people decide to live while vowing to get eachother's back. Nakama is the term the characters in Naruto, and in similar animes like One Piece, use to describe the bond they share.

In some ways, it gets regarded more highly than marriage itself, though mainly just in popular culture.

Couldn't have said it better myself, it adds depth to Naruto and Gaara's fight over ideals during the chunin exam.

weeble-san
04-08-2009, 03:26 PM
it means like uper classmen in high school

Soccer Ninja 21
04-08-2009, 05:45 PM
Wow, I'm learning so much! Because of a speech in school I'm taking notes on this (we can do it on anything we want and I'm doing mine on Japanese culture and or Ninjas) This is Japanese right, not Chinese or anything, I know it's not Chinese but it is a school thing and I must be sure. :D

Toma RNK
04-08-2009, 05:46 PM
Wow, I'm learning so much! Because of a speech in school I'm taking notes on this (we can do it on anything we want and I'm doing mine on Japanese culture and or Ninjas) This is Japanese right, not Chinese or anything, I know it's not Chinese but it is a school thing and I must be sure. :D
It''s japanese.

Soccer Ninja 21
04-08-2009, 05:48 PM
Thats what I thought. Also, how did the title of my topic change, because I didn't do it, I don't mind it. Just wondering. :?

Toma RNK
04-08-2009, 05:48 PM
Thats what I thought. Also, how did the title of my topic change, because I didn't do it, I don't mind it. Just wondering. :?

Mods.

Soccer Ninja 21
04-08-2009, 05:57 PM
Thats what I thought. Also, how did the title of my topic change, because I didn't do it, I don't mind it. Just wondering. :?

Mods.

Ya, that's what I though. I don't care so if you mods see this change away. Your titles sound so much cooler and complete. 8-)

Toma RNK
04-08-2009, 05:58 PM
Ya, that's what I though. I don't care so if you mods see this change away. Your titles sound so much cooler and complete. 8-)

It was more an "after the fact" thing. You didn't know when you made the thread all that stuff would be explained. But someone might be interested.

Soccer Ninja 21
04-08-2009, 06:00 PM
Ya, that's what I though. I don't care so if you mods see this change away. Your titles sound so much cooler and complete. 8-)

It was more an "after the fact" thing. You didn't know when you made the thread all that stuff would be explained. But someone might be interested.

Yeah, I like how topics can expand like that. It keeps thing interesting. :D

garraswerewolf
04-08-2009, 06:01 PM
I think Senpai is like an upperclassman, someone higher in rank than you.
That is the sense of it.

More literally, it means "Proceeding Person." It's a social term in Japanese that refers to the status of someone that's more experienced in doing something you're either doing or would like to, used most often in anime when refering to upperclassmen in school, though it applies within any sort of social system you can advance in, the military or a corporation being another example.

I carries with it the idea that they're your 'mentor.'
so you would be considered a senpai

Toma RNK
04-08-2009, 06:06 PM
(S)He is a mod, I would go with -sama due to the difference in "social" status. As we got onto much better terms I could progress to -san and eventually after years to -kun or -chan.

Soccer Ninja 21
04-08-2009, 06:10 PM
How far do those words date back too, that would be interesting to know, Tomarnk, you said you like answering questions so here you go. Answer away, anyone who knows. What's san too? srry I'm clueless japanese is not one of the launges offered in junior high. 7th grade.

Toma RNK
04-08-2009, 06:22 PM
The terms -san and -sama are pretty much as old as the language. I am unsure about -kun but assume the same is true.

-san is the default respectful term you use with strangers of the same status or id -sama could be used -san can be a "less formal" alternative.

Please note that calling someone equal or less in station to yourself is insulting.

Naruto
04-08-2009, 06:25 PM
This is like my foriegn language class.

Soccer Ninja 21
04-08-2009, 06:36 PM
This is like my foriegn language class.The terms -san and -sama are pretty much as old as the language. I am unsure about -kun but assume the same is true.

-san is the default respectful term you use with strangers of the same status or id -sama could be used -san can be a "less formal" alternative.

Please note that calling someone equal or less in station to yourself is insulting. Ya, this is like "Come learn Japanese" it's cool though. 8-) I wouldn't want to be the girl who insults some one else with these, It's probably really easy though, there are soooo many to keep straight! :shock:

SRhyse
04-08-2009, 06:38 PM
The terms -san and -sama are pretty much as old as the language. I am unsure about -kun but assume the same is true.

-san is the default respectful term you use with strangers of the same status or id -sama could be used -san can be a "less formal" alternative.

Please note that calling someone equal or less in station to yourself is insulting.
They are, and they do work in that way, but it might help a little to understand why Japanese developed to use things like 'san' and 'sama.' It isn't quite as simple as "Mr." and "Sir," but they are good analogies to start with.

San and sama function much like tomarnk described, and they're technically considered 'counters' or 'markers' for the words they come after. Japanese is a language obsessed with abbreviating, and many of their words overlap and are the same when they're spoken. In spoken Japanese, counters like 'san' and 'sama' let you know that the word that comes before it is a name.

It might sound odd, and they don't always use them in casual conversation, but without things like 'san' and 'sama,' it'd be extremely difficult to know whether or not what you were saying is someone's name.

FYI, 'Dono' would be Sir in this example, and 'Sama' would be Mr. San is the 'default' for names.

Toma RNK
04-08-2009, 06:39 PM
Calling a male person -chan is typically offensive as it is the least respectful female term. Its like saying "Oh look it's cute little benjamin." whereas -kun to a female is like saying "tomboy."

Soccer Ninja 21
04-08-2009, 06:46 PM
The terms -san and -sama are pretty much as old as the language. I am unsure about -kun but assume the same is true.

-san is the default respectful term you use with strangers of the same status or id -sama could be used -san can be a "less formal" alternative.

Please note that calling someone equal or less in station to yourself is insulting.
They are, and they do work in that way, but it might help a little to understand why Japanese developed to use things like 'san' and 'sama.' It isn't quite as simple as "Mr." and "Sir," but they are good analogies to start with.

San and sama function much like tomarnk described, and they're technically considered 'counters' or 'markers' for the words they come after. Japanese is a language obsessed with abbreviating, and many of their words overlap and are the same when they're spoken. In spoken Japanese, counters like 'san' and 'sama' let you know that the word that comes before it is a name.

It might sound odd, and they don't always use them in casual conversation, but without things like 'san' and 'sama,' it'd be extremely difficult to know whether or not what you were saying is someone's name.

FYI, 'Dono' would be Sir in this example, and 'Sama' would be Mr. San is the 'default' for names.

ok, let me see if I get this, calling someone -san or -sama is pretty much the same but -sama is more formal right? So if my name was Joe (it is not) and this kid comes up to me would it be dono or Sama or san...Oh my gosh my head is spinning!!! Is there any way to explain it in terms a little simpler? :shock: :?

Toma RNK
04-08-2009, 06:57 PM
Think of it lke this.

Everyone has a social rank Ill use points. Usually older people are higher in society and thus more respected. (Respect your elders.)

If someone is higher than you, use SAMA.
If you are the same use SAN.
If you are HIGHER use SAN just to be safe.
Children are typically called -kun or -chan.

Now as you get to know someone you get more comfortable with them. (You wouldn't call your girlfriends father by his first name unless you knew him REALLY well would you?)

Typically people on good terms use -Kun or -Chan depending on gender to show a true closeness as it takes guts to call someone a child, but amongst long term friends it is a privelege.

Now if you were the emperors friend you might use san or even sama just out of pure respect for the fact that you are no one compared to the emperor. Calling the emporer -kun could be dangerous except in very private settings.

-Dono is an old samurai term that is respectful to a child. By calling someone -dono you imply you are serving them but you are older and so don't use sama.

Soccer Ninja 21
04-08-2009, 07:04 PM
Think of it lke this.

Everyone has a social rank Ill use points. Usually older people are higher in society and thus more respected. (Respect your elders.)

If someone is higher than you, use SAMA.
If you are the same use SAN.
If you are HIGHER use SAN just to be safe.
Children are typically called -kun or -chan.

Now as you get to know someone you get more comfortable with them. (You wouldn't call your girlfriends father by his first name unless you knew him REALLY well would you?)

Typically people on good terms use -Kun or -Chan depending on gender to show a true closeness as it takes guts to call someone a child, but amongst long term friends it is a privelege.

Now if you were the emperors friend you might use san or even sama just out of pure respect for the fact that you are no one compared to the emperor. Calling the emporer -kun could be dangerous except in very private settings.

-Dono is an old samurai term that is respectful to a child. By calling someone -dono you imply you are serving them but you are older and so don't use sama.


Thanks that completly clears things up! So a samuri could serve a child? p.s I doubt I would have a girlfriend cuz i'm a girl, but I'm just joshing you, you where speaking hypotheiticly. ( I think I'm using that word right.)

Soccer Ninja 21
04-08-2009, 07:11 PM
see ya guys and girls I'll be on tomarrow sometime if any of you post latter to this i'll repsoned then c ya.

Memitim
02-20-2011, 11:30 PM
*bumps oldest thread I can find* :p